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. ♪ >>> welcome. i'm bob abernathy. it's good to have you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke ties with the roman catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedic
to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be ratified by the u.s. senate. russia, a long-time ally of iran voted
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are a lot of people missing st
, there is a bogyman around washington. european style socialism, and it is coming to get us. there are a lot of people who say you want european-style socialism, which causes me to wonder and tremble -- it is it going to be like england? germany? france? the most insidious thing is to build europe's government system and to some big threat to the united states. 27 nations in the european union alone is like any other part of the world. some things are better than others, some work better than others. some things are a threat to the way we do things here if we were to adopt them, and there is not much chance of that. they would feel the way we do things a threat to the way they do things. the differences -- rather than being in a bunker worrying about the dreadful socialism coming across the atlantic, we should really just look and see what works better and incorporate it. we always have done, even the language we speak here, coming from over there. actually, two languages spoken here come from over there. let's take a look at other countries, let's see what works, and improve them if necessary. we do
will give you the headlines when we managed to rebound. >> thank you very much. let us take a look at some of the other stories making headlines around the world. president barack obama is back a new company tax breaks in an attempt to regain the initiative as a midterm poll's loom. he is lobbying -- lobbying congress to let companies in the u.s. write off investment costs until 2011. what do business people think of this measure? a report from new jersey. all right -- let us go to washington now and talk to jake sherman. thank you for being with us. it really is not a particularly good time to be this particular president of the united states at the moment, at the polls are right. >> no, absolutely not. as you just mentioned. it is very difficult for this president. congress has been a lot of money revamping health care, saving family banks and other things that have gone along with the economic calamity we have been experiencing. and there is just not an appetite -- many did not see this appetite to spend more money, even if put tens of -- is potentially it could create jobs down the roa
, that much we know. anything else that you can tell us about this young man? >> we know very little about him at all. he attended an international school in switzerland, classmates say that he was a fan of the american nba basketball league. other than that we know very little. he is thought to be around 27 years old. perhaps not the most impressive person to take over the running of one of the bombers -- one of the world's most authoritarian countries. >> how are people reacting in south korea? of >> huge reaction. north korea is one of the world's most totalitarian governments. people are used to predicting its demise. here for the first time in a long time we potentially have a sense of the moment that change, a subtle shift. it might not look like a coronation, but definitely a sense that something is going on and people are very interested. >> thank you, john. joining the in the studios is john hamm, international studio analyst. there is no question that something important is happening. >> definitely. it is clear that this is the first step in anointing him as the successor. >> i asked
is a sports consultant for the newspaper did. thank you for being with us. how ingrained is the gambling industry in the game of cricket? >> i think it is hugely ingrained, but the differences like in england, india, or the sub-continent, betting is illegal. a large amount of the money invested goes unnoticed, no one knows who is betting, how much, or on what. >> are you then implying that expecting in cricket were legalized, it would remove some of this criminality that we have seen, for example, it in pakistan's tour of england? >> it would definitely help. for instance, this alleged bookmaker, the middle man who took a lot of money from a newspaper -- if he had bet legally, the money have gotten recorded in some shops in england. but if done in the sub- continent, no one knows how much money. in legalized betting would mean at least if you suspect some match, you can go back and track names, find out if someone has put in in unusual bet against the odd. if you find a large number having bet against the odds and having a huge winning exchanging hands because of that -- at least a good
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the unite
to the economy, but also to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported th
to the area through education and advocacy. during his 31 years in the u.s. foreign service, he served as ambassador at large for counter terrorism in the state department and as chief of mission in jerusalem. >> let me start with you. given the failure of diplomatic efforts to achieve peace in the middle east, why the continued failure of diplomatic efforts, and what can grassroots efforts to to stimulate the peace process? >> the failure of diplomatic efforts is due to the lack of commitment, sustained commitment to help these two struggling societies out of a terrible mess. the united states, i think can be faulted for its view that it's really up to the parties themselves to solve this. i think it's clear, now, that they cannot do this without strong intervention led by the united states, which has played such an active role. even that will not be enough to make lasting peace, as you suggest. there has to be a commitment to peace from the israeli people and palestinian people. at the moment, while they support and want peace, they don't believe it's possible. their support for offi
ago was the closest in modern memory. the australian people told us and they told us this in no uncertain terms on that date and in the days that have followed is this. we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> last week, tony abbott described himself as the head of a government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede defeat. >> the coalition won more votes and more seats than our p opponent, but sadly we did not get a chance to form a government. >> australia has grown used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more fragile and raises the obvious question. how long will it last? >> one way you can cemented this government together is to spend a lot of money. julia gillard has started doing just that. she has promised almost 10 billion australian dollars to education and development. given the narrowness of the parliamentary majority now, all it would take would be for the liberal government to lose a single election sometime over the next few years, and australia would have to return to the polls. >> does that mean that you will
they stay mentally and physically hit. we have an expert giving us insight into how they're coping. >> they are surviving as a group. not as a bunch of individuals. the psychological management from the surface takes that into account. we are dealing with them as a group and we understand that the secret of their well-being is treating them as a group and not as different individuals. >> speaking to my colleague, timothy wilcox, he joins us live from the mine had. tim, obviously rejoicing, we have seen the pictures, but the fact of the matter is that there is sort of a long ways to go. >> absolutely right. no one is getting any precise readings on when this could be brought to the surface, although we are hearing that it could be sooner than the beginning of november. the man that you were just listening to their, he was saying within a month. we could be looking at the middle of next month. drilling, as seen behind me, moving in from the oil industry, continuing all live long, yesterday reaching 78 meters with a capacity for drilling a very wide bore very quickly, but it keeps on
and women in the u.s. military stays in place. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and night will soon be falling in parts of the arctic. the latest battleground in the fight to exploit the world resources. politicians are meeting in moscow to discuss this. canada, the united states, russia, and some scandinavian countries are trying to assert their rights. in a moment, we'll hear the view from canada and norway. >> a record-breaking voyage by russian ships this summer through the shrinking size of the arctic sea. shrinking -- ice of the arctic sea. a new, fast route for russian energy exports to asia. we were taken on board the nuclear-powered ice breaker, which led the way just before the final leg of the journey. the russians keen to publicize how quickly they're exploiting the effects of climate change in the arctic. >> at the moment, this and the other ice breakers are needed to score the cargo ships safely through the northeast passage. according to many predictions, within 20 years, there will be no ice here at all. that means this could be an extremely busy shipping l
. it was leaked to the u.s. media somehow. people always say that it was a deliberate leak. i do not think it was. i do not think they have tourr in of criminal evidence arrest anybody. >> thank you india has launched a biometric id scheme. it will put more than 1 billion citizens on a database. it is hoping the database will give an accurate picture of indian society. the european commission appears set to defer legal action against france over its expulsion of thousands of roma migrants. a senior european commissioner compared to events during world war ii. the u.s. senate is investigating the release of the lockerbie bombing. medical experts and state department officials will be questioned about the scottish departments decision. key witnesses from the uk have rejected requests to attend. are scotland correspondent reports. >> it has been months since he was freed from prison to fly home to his family and libya. he was released on compassionate grounds by scottish government. >> imposed by a higher power, is rts in anyo course in a jurisdiction in any land can revoke or overruled. it is final
merit. >> i would like to get back to the word that phil used which is charisma and obama's charisma. that seems to me is what a lot of these tea party candidates have. that have this charismatic way about them. 'donnell, really very perky. >> let's explain. >> choose from delaware. she won the republican primary. very perky, very personable. a lot of the things that attract people to sarah palin are attracted to christine o'donnell in that way could you have ren paul has charisma of his own in kentucky. he is very plain-spoken. he's very sort of forthright. he seems very genuine to people. that is very charismatic. that is something that i think democrats are going to have to look at. they talk about the energy. >> people feel they want somebody on a horse riding up to the west to the south in the >> exactly. these people seem to be on a horse. the horse the what the right is what they feel is a horse against the president's social democratic policies. they do not like them. they do not want them. the democrats have to point out why these social democratic policies are good for the
from the u.s. he is called barbie. mexico argues that most of the weapons that the drug cartels use come from the u.s. the border situation is a difficult situation for both countries. >> thank you. sidecar bomber in the russian caucasus has quellekilled at le2 people. it was in the city of vladikavkaz in north ossetia. officials say the bomber blew up his vehicle by the main entrance to the market. the european parliament has passed a resolution calling on european governments to respect the rights of roman people. thas follows france's deportation of thousands of roman migrants. taliban leader mullah omar says his fighters are winning the war in afghanistan and that the nato led campaign has been a complete failure. those are his words. in a rare statement, he called on president obama to withdraw his troops unconditionally and as soon as possible. staying with afghanistan, in just over one hour, the british parliament will have a chance to debate and vote on the war against a taliban. british forces have been involved since the start of the conflict, but it is the first time the
. four simple words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a li
violating the rights of detainee's. the u.s. and european union's have welcomed the turkish referendum on constitutional changes. 60% of voters backed the referendums. they are aimed at bringing turkey more in line with the european union, which the government wants to join costs -- wants to join. flex the turkish prime minister had good reason to be delighted with these results. >> september the 12th will go down in history as a turning point in turkish democracy. you will always be remembered for this, we will always be remembered for this period september 12 has turned to a bright page with this referendum and a milestone for democracy. >> proving once again that he can win the support of voters when it counts, putting him in a strong position before next year's general election. but this has been a bitterly contested referendum with both sides trading insults. in the heat of a campaign there was little opportunity to inform the public of what they were being asked to inform upon or reject. los were not clear as to whether they trusted the main party. the opposition party ran a spir
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
the government to help us. >> but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected, and losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised initial payment of 120 pounds. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. she and all these children are living in classrooms next door. they and their families will be homeless again soon when school starts. >> let's round of some other main news. he said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. he was killed in 2005. he describes his words as a political accusation made too quickly. syria has always denied involvement. rescue teams have resumed their search for survivors of mud slide. authorities say 44 people have died. thousands more are at risk of flooding and landslides. south african trade unions have suspended their strike. more than 1 million civil servants will see the pay rise. union members say they will consider the latest offer. the spanish government has dismissed a cease-fire as insufficient after it said it will halt its violent campaign. the interior minister says they
.5%. exporters in the us and europe are rushing to fill the gap but at a price to the buyer. >>chandler: the cost of wheat out of the us might be exactly the same as it is out of france or russia but the cost of freight to get it to let's say egypt is significantly more out of us than what it is out of europe and the black sea. >>reporter: egypt is scrabbling to find replacement supplies. as the world's largest importer of wheat the country traditionally buys a third of its needs from russia. other countries in north africaand the middle east - which imports half its food - have also been hit hard by the russian ban. >>muriel: this is milling wheat - destined to make bread. the global demand for wheat is at a record level - an estimated 665 million tonnes in 2010-11. but the global wheat crop will only be around 646 million tonnes - which means wheat is trading at a premium. based on the chicago futures market wheat is a 100 dollars a tonne more expensive than maize, up from a 30 dollar a tonne premium at thestart of the summer season. so will the bread this wheat makes be selling at a premium to
of the day it's all about improving customer choice, improving convenience, ease of use, and developing that personal relationship with customers >>with handheld media devices being the "must have" gadget this season, is the e-book market about to turn a new page? >>we started with e-readers about two years and a half ago; we started with only five products...andnow we have 25 so we have a lot more choices for the customer. >> abirached: hello and welcome. i'm raya abirached and this is world business, your weekly insightinto the global business trends shaping our lives. multi-ethnic malaysia is often regarded as a model of racial harmony. but living in relative harmony is a lot different than enjoying national unity. that's something the country's prime minister is trying to bring about with his policy dubbed 1malaysia -- something he sees as vital not only to the country's social cohesion but also to its economic future. >>reporter: malaysia day. it marks the date in 1963 when the states of sarawak and sabah on the island of borneo joined with malaya to form the federation of malaysia
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
harm u.s. troops. the event was planned for saturday on the nine of -- anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. terry jones is getting criticism from the white house and fbi, but around the world there have already been protests. >> the president was forced to spend a rare news conference making an appeal for tolerance, saying muslims were neighbors and friends. the trouble is it looks as though he is getting more publicity to a group on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a church with a congregation of 50. he believes is what is the work of the devil and the threat and to burn korans. he said if forced muslims to abandon a plan to build a center on ground zero. >> we are still very hopeful that we will meet with the imam. >> it seems the koran burning will not happen. >> we are not at war against islam. we are at war against terrorist organizations. they have distorted islam or falsely used the banner of islam to engage in their destructive acts. >> and afghanistan, at the president's word has not been heard. protesters shouted death to obama. he warned the lives of u.s. troops are und
you for bringing us up today with the verdict. joining me in the studios is a businessman and philanthropist of south asian concern with peace initiatives in india. you just heard that with me. the judges appeared to have given the site to hindus. >> which oversight got it, my appeal would be that the issue is de-politicized. there is a risk of that political parties who have thrived on this division, they may seek to be opportunistic. the first is to appeal to all parties concerned. to seek a national unity on the issue. to allow the rule of law to prevail. we cannot afford what happened before and what continues to happen when a verdict against i. >> what do you sense of the sentiment on the ground? >> there is a state of anxiety. people are willing to have the local populace be calm, whatever the verdict. this is a test for the indian government and all political parties, and for the people -- will civic society prevail? will trust in the judicial process that has taken two decades prevail? >> as we understand from our correspondent a could go on again with a possible a
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
and put on planes to romania. >> today the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's atta
to overcome than others. so, this might be the case in the us where the pet food scandals, the melamine scandals certainly generated very, very high attention in the press and in the media. >>reporter: the reality of the "made in china" curse isn't lost on aigo, a popular maker of usb memory sticks, mp6 players and digital cameras. as an olympics and formula one sponsor, aigo enjoys a high profile in mainland china. but its chairman accepts that to be credible, globally, the bar for chinese companies is high, and so, until aigo has a strong overseas service network, he's holding-off on expanding abroad. >>feng: many, many companies want to sell products fast, but no service! it's a disaster for brands. because only if you have good service, you can give satisfaction to the consumer. so we need a partner. >>reporter: chinese exporters like white goods maker haier and beer maker tsingtao are strongly focused on service and brand awareness. that's why they're on the short list of chinese companies that foreigners might recognise. other players have raised their profiles by making big ticke
. but an agricultural initiative, with heavyweight backers, is using new technology to maximise efficiency and help lift people out of poverty. >>reporter: michel bougma is a farmer in the village of tiibin in burkina faso. >>life is hard here. the soil is deteriorating due to the high heat and wind. and climate change is resulting in shorter season cycles. food shortages abound. >>bonkoungou: challenge in my village, this village and around this village is the poverty of the soil. so yield is decreasing, so we have to make everything we can to make some more productive and this is why we research to find solutions to make more productivity for our people. >>reporter: and that's what's happening at inera, the institute for agricultural and environmental research in burkina faso. >>it has access to agora, the research 4 life programme supported by the food & agriculture organization... allowing free online access to high-quality, timely and relevant scientific journals, books and databases. >>traore: because of globalization, africa cannot be away from this technology knowledge sharing. so to have access
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)